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When Seattle-based artist Adrienne Antonson describes her artworks as being “resourceful, sustainable, meticulous and pretty,” she certainly has a point. Indeed, this might well be the perfect description for the insects she creates, using only human hair and glue. Antonson toys with her audience’s emotions, making them want to take a closer look while at the same time suppressing a feeling of disgust. While some of her insects, like the fly trio above, seem only too real, others are clearly objects of Antonson’s imagination. Separated from her subject by only a hair’s breadth, Antonson’s work has an intimate quality, as she uses only hair from close friends, family or her own body. In the process of creating the insects, the time spent on each piece naturally connects the artist with her materials as well as those who donated them. She explains: “The meticulous process of working with such an intimate fiber inspires a meditation on relationships and connectivity.” Using recycled and sustainable materials for all her artworks plays an important role for Antonson, and, as suggested, human hair is a very personal material to work with. Antonson’s sculptures have been displayed across the U.S.

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It was created for The Rocks Aroma Festival in Sydney, Australia, and seen by 130,000 people who attended the one-day coffee-lovers event.

Elaine Kelly, from event organisers the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority, was delighted with the result.

It measures 20 feet high and 13 feet wide and took a team of eight people three hours to complete. The different colours were created by adding no, little or lots of milk to each cup of black coffee. Each coffee cup was filled with varying amounts of milk to create the different sepia shades of the painting.

“Once we had the idea of creating an image out of coffee cups we searched for something iconic to reproduce – and opted for the most iconic painting in history."

Watch the video below to see how this iconic piece was re-created!


 
 
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The Pantone Color Institute has narrowed down their list of "Top Colors For 2011" to only one (predicted to be the hottest hue next year): Honeysuckle

“Honeysuckle is a captivating, stimulating color that gets the adrenaline going—perfect to ward off the blues,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

No need to tell Blake Lively, Eva Longoria, Julianne Mooreand other celebrities how hot honeysuckle is—they’ve been spotted rocking the pinkish-coral hue on the red carpet all year long.

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Honeysuckle is guaranteed to produce a healthy glow when worn by both men and women. It's a striking, eye-catching hue that works well for day and night in women's apparel, accessories and cosmetics, and in men's ties, shirts and sportswear. Add a lively flair to interior spaces with Honeysuckle patterned pillows, bedspreads, small appliances and tabletop accessories. Looking for an inexpensive way to perk up your home? Paint a wall in Honeysuckle for a dynamic burst of energy in the family room, kitchen or hallway.
 
 
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Princess Hijab, a Parisian artist, adds burqas and hijabs to unsuspecting advertisements in the subway and elsewhere. Although "she" is apparently apolitical, it's hard not to view the work in light of the recent hijab ban.

 
 
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The Oval Office is nearly as familiar an image as the president himself. But the first lady’s work space is the opposite: rarely photographed or mentioned by the press. Yet it’s a busy, highly trafficked part of the White House, where Michelle Obama makes phone calls, holds meetings, hosts visitors and conducts interviews. As she garners ever more attention for her initiatives, world travels and social engagements, we find ourselves wondering: What does her East Wing office look like?

With the help of White House aides, who shared details about the space and provided photos, POLITICO has assembled a peek at where FLOTUS gets her work done. One thing’s for sure: The work space is a far cry from the Oval Office.

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The first lady, who redecorated the space last summer, has gone for something more casual than the gold tones of the Oval Office: an off-white, overstuffed, living-room-type couch — with floral and other printed pillows — along with two brown-and-cream-patterned chairs. The space is painted a warm, cozy peach color, and the windows feature plantation-style shutters rather than curtains or blinds. In lieu of a personal desk, Obama asked that a round, 10-person table be brought in, so that her staff can gather for meetings.

 
 
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If you're traveling to NYC soon, then you MUST swing by and see these elaborate Bergdorf Goodman window displays on 5th Ave!

Store windows take forever to put together. Especially when you work at places known for their innovation, like Barney's New York, Bergdorf Goodman, or very clever specialty boutiques.

For example, Bergdorf Goodman's current windows, showing a vast array of vintage and miniature mannequins, hat-display heads, and Rebecca Martinez's pictures of vintage mannequins, took six years to plan and assemble.

"We always have projects on the back burner, so gradually, over time, we accumulate," David Hoey, director of visual presentation at Bergdorf Goodman, tells StyleList.

"It's not that simple, but one of the things we specialize in is putting together unusual collections -- antique toasters, vacuum cleaners, ventriloquist dummies, all kinds of crazy stuff."

Martinez's photos are from a series called "Beauty Challenged," and the mishmash of material conveys all sorts of challenges -- the shifting standard of beauty, the changes aging brings about, how a little peeling paint isn't the worst thing in the world.

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Hoey pulled it all together by dressing the mannequins in gorgeous new bits from Libertine, Badgley Mischka, Gucci, Miu Miu, Carolina Herrera, and more.

Hoey's past efforts will be celebrated this fall with the release of the Assouline book "Windows At Bergdorf Goodman." And someday in the future, we can look forward to seeing his collection of vintage Barbie clothes.

"We've been collecting for two or three years," Hoey says, adding, "we're going to pin them together to make curtains."

 
 
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Diane Von Furstenberg (DVF), Calvin Klein and Kenneth Cole have joined forces with MINI to create three new designs for charity. The car brand provided each designer with their favourite model and challenged them to add their own creative stamp.

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DVF's creation is covered with colourful lips and the bonnet is adorned with the designer's initials.

"Life is love, love is life! I wanted to create something that celebrates life and reminds us of the importance of health," said von Furstenberg. "The red colour of the MINI expresses the awareness of HIV/AIDS, the lips represent Diane von Furstenberg. This car is bursting with life and love."

 
 
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American retailer QVC recently conducted a survey of 2,000 women about who their beauty icons were. Audrey Hepburn topped the poll, followed closely by Cheryl Cole, and Marilyn Monroe came third. Other winners included Angelina Jolie, Scarlett Johansson and Grace Kelly.

The company celebrated the winners by commissioning graphic illustrator Daisy de Villenueve (Daisy has worked with everyone from TopShop to Nike) to create portraits of the top four icons using QVC make-up. Check them out below! :)

 
 
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Artist Meekyoung Shin specializes in crafting vases and statuary that look like they came from another century. Her work ranges from busts of Venus and Cycladic statues to gorgeous vases so thin that they're translucent. They're beautiful, seen in galleries and exhibitions all over the place — and they're all made of soap. That's right, the artist crafts her pieces, which she calls "translations," from run-of-the-mill suds. Recently, she even crafted a gold-plated Buddha out of soap. What do you think of her work?

Source: The Kukje Gallery